Skyros is the largest of the four islands in the Sporades group, the others being Skiathos, Skopelos and Alonissos. Skyros is the most southerly of the Sporades and lies of the east coast of Evia, just 24 nautical miles from the port of Kymi. Skyros is linked to both Evia and the mainland via a daily ferry service to Kymi (for details of ferry schedules please see the ‘Getting to Skyros’ section).

 

 

 

Skyros covers an area of 208 square kilometres; its formation and geological features give it the appearance that possibly at one time it was two separate islands that are now joined by a sandstone causeway. The southern part of the island, known locally as Vouno (mountain), is barren and stony with small pockets of Maple, Holm oak amongst other trees and meadow covered plateaus. Beyond the springs at Nyfi it is virtually uninhabited except for a few shepherds’ huts and is used predominantly for the grazing sheep, goats and the semi-wild indigenous Skyrian horses.

By contrast the northern part of the island, Meroi (gentle, tame), is dominated by its forests of Aleppo pine trees and is home to all the major settlements on the island. In this area lies Chorio, the capital of Skyros and the wide valleys of Kambos, Trachi and Kalikri which are the main areas for cultivation of barley and wheat.

Skyros is the largest of the four islands in the Sporades group, the others being Skiathos, Skopolos and Alonisos. Skyros is the most southerly of the Sporades and lies off the east coast of Evia, just 24 nautical miles from the port of Kymi. Skyros is linked to both Evia and the mainland via a daily ferry service to Kymi (for details of ferry schedules please see the ‘Getting to Skyros’ section).

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